02/2013

OBSAH / CONTENTS 2013-02

Štúdie, články / Studies, Articles

Miklós HALMÁGYI: Gericht auf Erden, Gnade im Himmel. Hagiografische Kontexte der mittelalterlichen Urteile / Sentence on Earth, Grace in Heaven. Historiographical Contexts of Medieval Judical Judgements (pp. 176-189)

Miroslav HUŤKA: Uhorskí augustiniáni v historickej a literárnej spisbe (s prihliadnutím na územie Slovenska) / Hungarian Augustinians in Historical and Literary Writings (with Regard to the Territory of Slovakia) (pp. 190-206)

Sylwia KONARSKA-ZIMNICKA: ‘Such dances are not reproved’ – or the Matter of Consent for Dance in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era / „Takéto tance nie sú zakázané“ – alebo odobrenie tanca v stredoveku a ranom novoveku (pp. 207-217)

Vadim ZADUNAJSKI: Základné črty polovojenského života ukrajinských kozákov na konci 19. a začiatku 20. storočia / Basic Features of the Ukrainian Cossacks’ Paramilitary Life in the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries (pp. 218-231)

Marek ŠMÍD: Příspěvek ke vztahu Čechů a Slováků po vzniku společného československého státu v roce 1918 / Contribution to the Relations between the Czechs and Slovaks after the Establishment of Their Common Czechoslovak State in 1918 (pp. 232-259)

Pramene, preklady / Sources, Translations

Humbert z Romans OP : Výklad reguly sv. Augustína / Humbert of Romans OP : Commentary on the Rule of Saint Augustine (pp. 260-287)

Rozhovory / Interviews

Rozhovor s profesorem Pavlem Markem: „Vůdčí myšlenkou mého úsilí je zůstat vždy spravedlivým a objektivním.“ / Interview with Prof. Pavel Marek: “The Leading Idea of My Efforts is to Always Remain Impartial and Objective.” (pp. 288-296)

Recenzie / Reviews (pp. 297-310)

Anotácie, nové knihy / Annotations, New books (pp. 311-326)

Správy, referáty / Brief notices (pp. 327-333)

Internetové odkazy / Web links (pp. 334-338)

Pokyny pre autorov / Guidelines for contributors (pp. 339-340)

Publication Ethics and Malpractice Statement (pp. 341-342)


 ABSTRAKTY

 

Kultúrne dejiny / Cultural History, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 176-189 © Verbum 2013
Miklós HALMÁGYI: Gericht auf Erden, Gnade im Himmel. Hagiografische Kontexte der mittelalterlichen Urteile / Sentence on Earth, Grace in Heaven. Historiographical Contexts of Medieval Judical Judgements

KEYWORDS: Middle Ages, Hungary, hagiography, historiography
ABSTRACT: In biographies of saints it is a frequently used turn, that a person sentenced to death escapes in a miraculous way. In this present study mainly based on medieval sources, I discuss motifs about this subject. Comparing these stories, a lot of questions can be raised. Whether the convicted was guilty or innocent? If he was guilty, why was he saved by heavenly Grace, and what happened to him after his escape? These stories suggest, how important it was for the authors of the legends and for their heroes the protection of life and the possibility to the conversion.
In biographies of saints it is a frequently used turn that a person sentenced to death escapes in a miraculous way. In this present study, mainly based on medieval sources, I discuss motifs about this subject. Comparing these stories, a lot of questions can be raised. Whether the convicted person was guilty or innocent? If he was guilty, why was he saved by heavenly Grace, and what happened to him after his escape? Was he saved by a miracle or in other way or something changed in the soul of the persons judging him? What kind of relationship did the author have with the earthly judge and what did he achieve with his story? In some narratives there are no miracles. Prophet Daniel and Jesus saved the accused woman with the power of wisdom. Saint Nicolas rescued three accused soldiers with his energetic behaviour. However, there is a miraculous element in many legends. In some stories these miracles happen during the life of the saints, in other legends these miracles occur after their death. In many narratives the convicted persons were saved from the gallows: e. g. in the legends of St. Eparchius, St. Jacob, St. Zoerard/Andrew of Nitra and in the chronicle of Radulfus Glaber. In his study Friedrich Lotter points out that the early Christian authors, like Lactancius and Ambrosius rejected the capital punishment. Lotter,s study based on the collection of De Gaiffier treats the stories about persons cheating the gallows. He examines 42 cases in the period between the sixth and fifteenth centuries. He underlines the fact, that the escaped convicts in the early Carolingian age were guilty. About tenth-eleventh centuries the number of the innocent convicts increased, and in the late Middle Ages the innocents were in majority. His conclusion is, that the Church accepted the right of the state to the capital punishment by the time of the late Middle Ages. In most of the narratives we do not know what happened to the escaped convicts. In the legend of St. Eparchius the escaped person took refuge in a church. In the chronicle of Raul Glaber the escaped criminal returned to his former sinful life. In some narratives there was only one condemned person. In other legends there were two convicts: one of them was guilty, the other was innocent. In some stories the convicted person was innocent, like in the case of Susanne in the book of Daniel. The three soldiers and the three commanders saved by St. Nicolas were innocent as well. The old man accused with ox-theft in the chronicle of Glaber and the young pilgrim on the way to Compostela in the legend of St. Jacob were guiltless, too. On the other hand, in many stories there is no doubt about the guiltiness of the accused person. In these cases it can be asked, why they were saved? The Ten Commandments say: do not kill. Christ urged his disciples: do not judge if you don’t want to be judged. The God declares in the book of Ezekiel ‘I do not take pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather in the conversion of the wicked who changes his ways and saves his life’. In the legends about the escaping convicts this spirituality can be found. For the saints and for the authors of the legends it was not only the protection of their life, that mattered, but also the possibility to the conversion.


Kultúrne dejiny / Cultural History, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 190-206 © Verbum 2013
Miroslav HUŤKA: Uhorskí augustiniáni v historickej a literárnej spisbe (s prihliadnutím na územie Slovenska) / Hungarian Augustinians in Historical and Literary Writings (with Regard to the Territory of Slovakia)

KEYWORDS: historiography, Hungary, Slovakia, Augustinians, Middle Ages
ABSTRACT: The paper deals with the published historical literature and sources related to the history of the Order of the Hermits of Saint Augustine with special regard to the territory of the present-day Slovakia. It focuses on the order’s historiography from the 14th century up to the contemporary, modern works of historians examining the history of the Augustinians in the territory of the former Hungary. It pays special attention to the 17th century when key works for the history of the whole order appeared (e.g. by N. Crusenius, I. Naevius or T. de Herrera). Besides foreign European and American historians, the author of the paper introduces those Magyar and Slovak authors who, at least marginally, have dealt with the history of Augustinians. In Slovakia several relevant articles have been published so far. They, however, zero in on the Augustinians only tangentially.
In the Middle Ages the Order of Saint Augustine or the Augustinians belonged to the less widespread religious orders. This applied not only to the territory of the presentday Slovakia but also to the former Hungary as a whole. It was estimated that the number of all Augustinian monasteries in the Carpathian Basin was only about 40 and just four of them were in the territory of Slovakia. The oldest (dated by 1274) was the monastery of St. Stanislav in Veľký Šariš. Probably from this centre two other monasteries arouse by filiation: monastery of the Holy Spirit in nearby Hrabkov and maybe the Priorate of St. Elisabeth in Spišské Podhradie as well. On the other hand, the fourth Slovak monastery of St. John the Baptist in Bardejov arose by filiation from Cracow. Shortly after its establishment, however, it became part of the Hungarian province. All Hungarian monasteries, including four Slovak convents, ceased to exist as early as in the 16th century. This fact is also reflected in the interest of the contemporary historians in their history. Only gradually modern histories of particular priorates begin to be published. Syntheses related to the history of the Augustinian order are rare and they are confined to the present-day Hungary. The fundamental work in this regard is the bibliography to the history and theology of the Augustinians compiled by Egon Gindele et al. (up to 1976). This publication, however, focuses just on the period until the Reformation. The oldest work partly dealing with the territory of the former Hungary was, however, written by an anonymous chronicler from Florence in 1326 – 1342. He wrote a short legend about St. Vitus from Hungary (Pannonia). This information also occurred in later writings, e.g. in the work of Joseph Pamphil from 1581. The crucial period for the historiography of the Order of Saint Augustine was the 17th century. In that time important works by order historians such as Nicolaus Crusenius sprang up. The latter’s work is of immense value for the history of Augustinians
in Hungary because he detailed not only the monastery structure but also the most significant Augustinians connected with this territory. The information is arranged chronologically according to years and periods. Another significant historian was Thomas de Herrera with his Alphabetum Augustinianum. The latter constitutes a rather voluminous work with a tremendous amount of information ordered, as it is clear from the title, alphabetically. Other 17th century authors include Iohannes Naevius, Giovanni Marques and Luigi Torreli. Later order historians, such as Giuseppe Lanteri, mostly worked with the information provided by these older authors. Very important for historians are the series of sources that have been issued by the Augustinians since the 17th century, e.g. Bvllarivm Ordinis by Laurentius Empoli (1628). Very interesting are also the registers of the general priors that have been published since 1976. The first, partly domestic work is the book on the history of the Hungarian order province published by Pál Xystus Schier and Martinus Rosnák in 1778. Other works were published in the 19th century, e.g. Monasteriologiae regni Hungariae (1860) by Damianus Fuxhoffer and Maurus Czinár who dealt in their work with the Augustinians, too. The first modern and at the same time the last synthesis on the history of the order was Az Ágostonrendiek Magyarországon (The Order of Augustinians in Hungary) published by Ferenc Fallenbüchl in 1943. Since 2000 there have been just a few works on the history of the Augustinian order (for instance by Gabriel Adriányi or Beatrix Romhányi). Slovak historians, besides the present author, deal with the history of Augustinians only marginally: for example Michal Slivka, Marián Čižmár or Ferdinand Uličný. The recently intensified activities of archaeologists will also certainly contribute to the knowledge of the history of monasteries in Slovakia (Marián Čurný). Slovak Augustinian monasteries attracted several Polish historians, too, such as Grzegorz Uth or Stanisław Andrzej Sroka.


Kultúrne dejiny / Cultural History, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 207-217 © Verbum 2013
Sylwia KONARSKA-ZIMNICKA: ‘Such dances are not reproved’ – or the Matter of Consent for Dance in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era / „Takéto tance nie sú zakázané“ – alebo odobrenie tanca v stredoveku a ranom novoveku

KEYWORDS: Middle Ages, Renaissance, dance, culture
ABSTRACT: ‘Such dances are not reproved’– or the Matter of Consent for Dance in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era” is based on original sources. The article is about liberalization of raw opinions on the subject of the dance and dancers in the Middle Ages and Early Modern World. Dance was one of the most meaningful ways of expressing one’s feelings. It was also a very enjoyable form of recreation, social closeness, or even a game filled with eroticism, a flirtation of dancers. And that is why dance and dancers were criticised. But as the dance knows no boundaries, it was practised very willingly by representatives of all social classes without exemption. And that was the main reason of appeasement of clerical critic’s hitherto existing opinion.


Kultúrne dejiny / Cultural History, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 218-231 © Verbum 2013
Vadim ZADUNAJSKI: Základné črty polovojenského života ukrajinských kozákov na konci 19. a začiatku 20. storočia / Basic Features of the Ukrainian Cossacks’ Paramilitary Life in the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries

KEYWORDS: Cossacks, the Kuban Cossack army, tradition, cavalry, infantry, contest, martial arts, military democracy
ABSTRACT: In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the Ukrainian Cossacks dominated in the Kuban Cossack army (the largest of the Cossack units of the Russian Empire). A longterm military service and constant military training had contributed to the maintenance and development of the Cossack military and martial arts. Besides teaching military values and the Cossack way of life, various paramilitary contests were organized to maintain high-quality military training. These contests were held both in the front line military units and in the Cossack settlements (with both adult and child contestants). The Cossacks’ long-term and hard military service became the basis for certain socio-economic, societal, legal and military privileges. In the places of their compact residence, the Cossacks implemented the principles of military democracy and paramilitary way of life.
Prior to the World War I, the number of the Kuban Cossacks was 1,400,000. They inhabited the both banks of the lower and middle reaches of the Kuban River, from the eastern shore of the Azov Sea up to the Stavropol Highlands.
One should remember that in the late 19th and early 20th centuries the Cossacks in the Tsarist Russia commanded a privileged military status. They enjoyed a range of socio-economic, societal, legal and military privileges.
The Cossacks were provided with a very good military training. The skills gained were checked out in many paramilitary contests. All contestants competed in similar paramilitary disciplines. The winners were awarded valuable prizes (e.g. weapons and parts of equipment as well as higher sums of money). All this contributed to the graveness of the contests, welded the famous Cossack community together and attracted the Cossack youth.
It should be emphasized that besides teaching military values and the Cossack way of life and in addition to the welding the military Cossack community together, the above mentioned contests contributed to the maintenance and development of the Cossack military and martial arts. It should be also underlined that the existence of this special military and martial arts in the Cossack environment represented a complementary factor in the forming and maintaining of paramilitary values in the life of the Cossack community.
The elements of the Cossack tactics had been inherited from the former Ukrainian Cossack units. This is indicated by the corresponding Ukrainian terminology. These forms of tactics were rather sophisticated and they required a long-term training and constant practice, which was possible only in the Cossack environment.
The main weapon of the Kuban Cossack cavalry was a “shashka”. It was a sword with a slightly curved blade, i.e. a Caucasian sort of sabre. Another, less often used weapon was a kindjal – a long Caucasian dagger. This was the reason why the Cossack cavalry, surpassed the regular Russian Tsarist cavalry. In regard to the Cossack martial arts it is necessary to say that they were fundamentally connected with the elements of mastering blade weapons in a one-on-one fight. At the same time the maximum unification of the firearms, in line with the scientific progress in the field, did not mean the emergence of a special Cossack way of shooting.
Under the influence of the Tsarist unification of fighting at the early 20th century, a basic level of mastering blade weapons was launched – several blows and manoeuvres with a sword, a few blows and hits with a bayonet and gunstock and protection with a sabre and rifle. This was compulsory for all Cossack soldiers. In addition, in that time the higher level of the martial arts, often the heritage of older Ukrainian Cossack units, was not prescribed and much depended on the personal qualities of a Cossack (or those of his teachers) as well as on the environment in which the soldier was trained.
Off course, the above mentioned peculiarities of the Cossack community were not ideal. In addition, not all Cossacks inclined to this way of life. This kind of preparation was, however, effective. Such a reality was shaping peculiar values and stereotypes of the awareness of military status both in the individual and in the whole Cossack community at the level of the farmstead, station, district and army. It was strengthened and maintained by compromises with the central power by means of particular socio-economic, societal and legal privileges guaranteed by the Russian Tsar as a compensation for a long-term and hard military service.
In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the Kuban Cossack army (mostly composed of the Ukrainian Cossacks) had a clearly defined military system and an adequate complex of military training and serving Cossacks (strengthened by specific martial and military arts). There was also a paramilitary character of the local Cossack community. At the same time there were Ukrainian military Cossack traditions and the influence of the Tsarist unification necessary in case of war.


Kultúrne dejiny / Cultural History, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 232-259 © Verbum 2013
Marek ŠMÍD: Příspěvek ke vztahu Čechů a Slováků po vzniku společného československého státu v roce 1918 / Contribution to the Relations between the Czechs and Slovaks after the Establishment of Their Common Czechoslovak State in 1918

KEYWORDS: Czechoslovakia 1918 – 1921, Slovakia, Czech and Slovak relations, establishment of Czechoslovakia
ABSTRACT: The paper deals with the relations between the Czechs and Slovaks after the establishment of their common state in 1918. It reveals the differences between the conditions and expectations of the Czech and Slovak societies at the very foundation of Czecho-Slovakia and to what extent they became disharmonious shortly afterwards.
The traditional agrarian and Catholic Slovak society differed in many respects from the industrial and progressive Czech society. The forcibly promoted idea of the Czechoslovak unity did not contribute to the convergence either. Several Slovak political leaders narrowed their demands to the political level and decided to press for them in the parliament by means of their programme of Slovak autonomy. Finally, the paper shows that the differences at national, political, social and economic level, as they were accentuated in the Czecho-Slovak conflict at the end of the 20th century, originated in the years 1918 – 1921.
The paper deals with the relations between the Czechs and Slovaks in the years after the foundation of the Czecho-Slovak state. It tries to reveal to what extent its existence was a natural decision for the Czech elites. For Slovak leaders it was in many respects different and as a logical way it began to be perceived only towards the end of the World War I. A natural concern, for instance, was arising from the thousand-year reminiscences of Magyar dominance and the experience with the idea of the unitary Hungarian nation or the efforts of Hungarian government to grant the Slovaks autonomy in the time of the collapsing Habsburg monarchy. Uncertainty was also fuelled by the lack of clarity regarding the future arrangement and the everyday life of the common state that were based on the leading ideas of the founders of Czechoslovakia: T. G. Masaryk, E. Beneš and M. R. Štefánik.
One of the manifestations of the different approach of the Czechs and Slovaks after 1918 was their attitude to the Catholic Church. In the Czech Lands the latter was harshly attacked. It became a symbol of the old rigid monarchy and many faithful left it. In Slovakia, on the other hand, a similar anti-Catholic camp did not emerge and apostasies were rather rare. The Catholic faith was firmly fused with the majority of Slovak people.
Although the religious situation in Slovakia attracted the attention of political and religious elites in Czecho-Slovakia, it was rather for the vacant bishop sees and unresolved arrangement of the church conditions in the east of the country. Magyar bishops of Spiš and Nitra were expelled from the republic. The Czechoslovak government and Foreign Minister E. Beneš, however, could not agree on the proposed bishop candidates with the Vatican. Only after long and complicated negotiations they arrived at compromise. M. Blaha was chosen for Banská Bystrica, K. Kmeťko for Nitra and J. Vojtaššák for Spiš. On 13 February 1921 they were ordained in the Piarist Church of St. Ladislaus in Nitra.
The differences were gradually becoming visible in many other respects as well, including school, political and economic issues. Slovakia lacked qualified officials, teachers and intellectuals. In the liberation of the country a lot of hard fighting for many Slovak localities had to be done. The post-war hardship in Slovakia was often seen as discrimination. Many economic difficulties were politicized. Slovak political elites, therefore, became attached to the Pittsburgh Agreement from May 1918 and began to promote the idea of Slovak autonomy in Czechoslovakia. For this reason, in the summer of 1919 a Slovak politician and priest, Andrej Hlinka, left for Paris with a memorandum to draw attention of the Peace Conference at Versailles to the errors and mistakes of the Czechs in Slovakia. His subsequent imprisonment in Bohemia was just the wind in the sails of the growing autonomist movement that began to speak against Czechoslovakism.


Kultúrne dejiny / Cultural History, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 260-287 © Verbum 2013
Humbert z Romans OP : Výklad reguly sv. Augustína / Humbert of Romans OP : Commentary on the Rule of Saint Augustine

KEYWORDS: Humbert of Romans, Middle Ages, Dominicans, medieval religious orders, medieval erudition, spirituality
ABSTRACT: Humbert of Romans died on 14 July 1277. He was buried in the convent church at Valenciennes. Although he has never been officially beatified, in 1278 his name was recorded in the order’s martyrology at the General Chapter of Milan and in the Order of Preachers he is worshipped as blessed.
Humbert’s works are on topics on which he felt himself qualified to write and which he considered to be fundamental for both the present and the future of the order. They include homiletics and the Dominican modus vivendi. His writings can be roughly divided into three groups: 1. epistles, 2. monastic writings and 3. homiletic writings. Humbert’s texts authentically evidence his long-term organizational impact on the institutional development of the Dominican Order.
The Commentary of the Rule of St. Augustine is a work primarily intended for the internal use of the Order of Preachers. As the Expositio regulae S. Augustini it was written in 1248 – 1254. From the total number of 209 chapters we have selected five (143, 144, 148, 149 and 151). They were on learning as such, philosophy, access to the books and on the office of lectors. These reflect a very punctilious ability of the author to capture the finest details as well as his extraordinary
capacity to accurately describe the things about which he was writing. In addition, they constitute an excellent source for all who want to become familiar with the contemporary Dominican multi-layer educational competences of the master of the novices, lector of the convent and the librarian and his duties.


Kultúrne dejiny / Cultural History, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 288-296 © Verbum 2013
Rozhovor s profesorem Pavlem Markem: „Vůdčí myšlenkou mého úsilí je zůstat vždy spravedlivým a objektivním.“ / Interview with Prof. Pavel Marek: “The Leading Idea of My Efforts is to Always Remain Impartial and Objective.”

ABSTRACT: Pavel Marek is professor at the Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Letters, Catholic University in Ružomberok. At the same time he works as professor at the Department of History, Faculty of Arts and Letters, Palacký University in Olomouc. He deals with the Czech and Czechoslovak history of the 19th and 20th centuries, particularly with the history of political parties in Czechoslovakia, political Catholicism and history of Christian politics. In his research he focuses on significant church personalities such as K. Dostál-Lutinov, T. Kohn, F. Kordač, E. Dlouhý-Pokorný, J. Šrámek, F. Světlík, etc. In addition to his interest in the history of the Roman Catholic Church, he also deals with the origin and development of the Czechoslovak (Hussite) Church and the history of the Orthodox Church.


Kultúrne dejiny / Cultural History, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 297-310 © Verbum 2013
Recenzie / Reviews

Miloš Jesenský, Kostol v Ludrovej (Štefan Valášek) (p. 297)
Tünde Lengyelová et alii, Thurzovci a ich historický význam (František Koreň) (p. 299)
Kálmán Mikszáth a jeho súčasníci : regionalizmus v kontexte literatúry stredoeurópskych národov na konci 19. storočia / Mikszáth Kálmán és kortársai : Regionalizmus a 19. század végén a közép-európai irodalmak kontextusában, ed. Szilvia Sipos (Mária Ivanová) (p. 302)
Dejiny knižnej kultúry v Košiciach do roku 1945. Bibliografia (Agáta Klimeková) (p. 305)
Jiří Malíř et alii, Biografický slovník poslanců moravského zemského sněmu v letech 1861 – 1918 (Pavel Marek) (p. 307)


Kultúrne dejiny / Cultural History, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 311-326 © Verbum 2013
Anotácie, nové knihy / Annotations, New books

Vlasta Jaksicsová, Kultúra v dejinách, dejiny v kultúre : moderna a slovenský intelektuál v siločiarach prvej polovice 20. storočia (Michal Marťák) (p. 311)
Wolfgang Hameter - Sven Tost (eds.), Alte Geschichte. Der Vordere Orient und der mediterrane Raum vom 4. Jahrtausend v. Chr. bis zum 7. Jahrhundert n. Chr. (Marek Babic) (p. 312)
Marcela Andoková, Rečnícke umenie sv. Augustína. V kázňach k stupňovým žalmom (Marek Babic) (p. 313)
Jacques Le Goff, Svatý Ludvík (Monika Tatáriková) (p. 314)
Matúš Kučera, State a články k slovenskému stredoveku, ed. Martin Homza (Lukáš Tkáč) (p. 315)
Peter Zubko, Kult Svätej krvi v Košiciach : rozprávanie o stratených stredovekých relikviách (Jaroslav Nemeš) (p. 316)
Miloš Kovačka et alii, Akty a závery – Zákony a ustanovenia Žilinskej synody (František Koreň) (p. 317)
István Käfer - Eszter Kovács, Ave Tyrnavia! A nagyszombati Akadémiai Nyomda kiadványai 1648 – 1777 / Ave Tyrnavia! Publikácie Akademickej tlačiarne v Trnave, Budapešť – Ostrihom – Trnava 2013 (Alžbeta Hološová) (p. 318)
Ingrid Kušniráková et alii, „Vyjdeme v noci vo fakľovom sprievode a rozsvietime svet“: Integračný a mobilizačný význam slávností v živote spoločnosti (Michal Marťák) (p. 319)
Peter Macho, Milan Rastislav Štefánik v hlavách a srdciach : fenomén národného hrdinu v historickej pamäti (Pavol Lukáč) (p. 320)
Michal Kšiňan et alii, Komunisti a povstania : ritualizácia pripomínania si protifašistických povstaní v strednej Európe 1945 – 1960 (Pavol Lukáč) (p. 321)
Pavol Jakubčin, Pastieri v osídlach moci : komunistický režim a katolícki kňazi na Slovensku v rokoch 1948 – 1968 (Michaela Vieriková) (p. 322)
Martin Franc - Jiří Knapík, Volný čas v českých zemích 1957 – 1967 (Michaela Vieriková) (p. 322)
Milica Majeriková-Molitoris - Ľudomír Molitoris - Marián Smondek, Tajné dejiny hornej Oravy (Lukáš Tkáč) (p. 323)
Hana Kábová, Josef Vítězslav Šimák : jeho život a dílo se zvláštním zřetelem k historické vlastivědě (Eliška Kozarcová) (p. 324)
Bibliotheca Alexandrina I, ed. Tomáš Klokner (Adam Rada) (p. 325)
Acta historica Neosoliensia. Vedecký časopis pre historické vedy, 15/2012, č. 1-2 (Jaroslav Nemeš) (p. 326)


Kultúrne dejiny / Cultural History, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 327-333 © Verbum 2013
Správy, referáty / Brief notices


Kultúrne dejiny / Cultural History, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 334-338 © Verbum 2013
Internetové odkazy / Web links


Kultúrne dejiny / Cultural History, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 339-340 © Verbum 2013
Pokyny pre autorov / Guidelines for contributors


Kultúrne dejiny / Cultural History, Volume 4, Issue 2, pp. 341-342 © Verbum 2013
Publication Ethics and Malpractice Statement

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